Therese Willkomm – The McGyver of AT

Over the last few months, we’ve had the privilege of participating in Therese Willkomm’s workshops demonstrating how she uses every day materials to create AT solutions for individuals with disabilities.  Dr. Willkomm is the director of ATinNH, the New Hampshire state wide assistive technology program with the Institute on Disability and is an assistant professor in the department of occupational therapy at the University of New Hampshire.  She uses a wide variety of easy to find materials like corrugated plastic, corner guard, plastic tubing and U Glue to create iPad and book stands, iPhone stands for projection, cup holders and hundreds of other practical AT supports.  Check out her Traveling Eileen™ iPad holder, www.youtube.com/watch?v=DGxcYbFO-Fg

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To learn more about her creative ideas, read her book, Assistive Technology Solutions in Minutes Book II: Ordinary Items, Extraordinary Solutions. 

 

 

 

Free Resources for Making Visual Supports

The new school year is upon us. The frantic rush to set up the classroom, make communication boards, visual supports etc. but you don’t have the necessary program or money to purchase your own software. Check out these free resources for creating visual supports fast and free.

Quick Pics from Patick Ecker

Connect Ability, Create Visual Supports for your child, visual engine.

Photosyms

Picto4Me: An app for your computer that you can install to Chrome

Escape the summer heat!

Today’s video is longer, so pour yourself a refreshing cool beverage and watch this webinar from Don Johnston on supporting students with significant disabilities learn become writers.  It features the First Author Writing Software from Don Johnston.

<p><a href=”http://vimeo.com/75607425″>Webinar: “Can Low-Incidence Students Become First-Time Writers? Yes!” (2013 Version)</a> from <a href=”http://vimeo.com/donjohnstoninc”>DonJohnstonInc</a> on <a href=”https://vimeo.com”>Vimeo</a>.</p>

Amazing ring that will read text

Researchers at MIT have done it again.  View this on-line article about a ring that they are developing which will perform OCR and Text to Speech as an individual moves his finger across the text. (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/08/fingerreader-read-blind-mit_n_5565898.html?ncid=fcbklnkushpmg00000063) Can’t wait for it to be produced.  It will be life changing for many.